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tv   [untitled]    January 21, 2013 6:30pm-7:00pm PST

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intact and appreciate the worth. justice is a public face of love and 60% of kids who are discipline read likely to drop out of school, so if we attach the same concerns that we have for all of the students and comparing with the evidence base data that suggests there are a lairming rates of suspensions and explullions and how does that push the conversation or do other things that we are innovative with and coming up with real solutions? not just to bullying but all of the social factors that affect students and adults and there are several adults that need training as well. that's my point. >> yeah. actually the work place bullying institute which has good data i am told and found that 35% of american employees say that they have been bullied in the work place. that is about double over the
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figure for kids so this is not a kid problem, but so are you asking if there should be programs and campaigns aimed at minority students as a different kind of solution? and we can i can ask you of that first and then to the panel. >> in coming up with ways in we handle perceived discipline situations i think there are better policies than responding like one of the district attorney's said and hard first and soft after. the thing is not just district attorneys which is a much later process so they can kind of be absolved of the immediate response -- >> and called in as a last resort. >> exactly but there are school police and administrators that
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operate under the hard first mentality and in my opinion as an individual person it seems unfortunate, and so i only pose these things because i don't see them talked a lot in public forums or in she's situations and talking about race and these things and being uncomfortable and challenging the seed in the conversations, in the back of our minds with these conversations i see it as important. i don't have all the solutions and answers but i think it's important to add that perspective to the conversation. >> point well taken. >> i have the answer. >> okay. alice has the answer. >> i don't mean to be facetious and worked as a teacher and nonprofit organizationses, both in media and out and now for a for profit company if we spent as much money and time as
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training teachers as i became a teacher i think my big skill coming out i went to nyu and bachelor's in elementary ed. i could thread a projector with the best of them and my career in the 70's and in the last panel "if you had all the money what would you invest in?" . i would invest in education and we're not investing in the future of the children and the in the country and the global future of our world and i agree absolutely with everything you said. we're short changing our kids and not giving teachers the resources. there is mold in the teacher's work room. if i worked in the building that many children go to school in i wouldn't go to work either and in answer to your question there
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is a priority here about education that's not quite right. >> and while we're earmarking money i would totally support that and i feel that we should train teachers in digital media. you can't teach cooking out a kitchen, so we need to bring digital media into the classroom so people can practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring curriculums in the world and teaching it out of the context.
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>> we have to stop blocking. >> yeah. i don't know. >> somebody -- okay. >> teachable moment. >> i hear everybody talk about -- >> thank you. >> yeah. so i have learned the phrase "teachable moment" since becoming a resource officer and i try to incorp rat that with a discipline situation and i try to use the teachable moment with the parents as well so you can move forward all together instead of just making everybody upset. >> i have some comments actually responding to what you asked about, the zero tolerance and different proposallity. one of my colleague and looked at this across the last 15 years and noticed a trend what we called "net widening and net
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deepening" and more behaviors that fall under expulsion and suspending and when talking to administrators and their policies he found it helpful to speak of these terms in termses of behaviors and rather than saying we're criminalizing you and the think language is also important and i want to thank you for bringing up that point. it's something that i really advocate for and our caution to use zero tolerance and exclusionary discipline policies and also i teach teachers at san jose state and hundred students who are future teachers. >> can they do a projector? >> no. my teacher did, but again using social media, integrating all of the areas is so important for the prevention. thank you for that focus too and i think that gentleman has
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comments. >> i was going to follow up in the conversation with digital media or literacy needed within the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a
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huge impact in regards to bullying or electronic aggression or whatever name we want to place on it and is affecting the students and i am excited you're addressing this issue and it's a crucial time for this generation and if we don't take serious this conversation today and action tomorrow we will see more and more issues arise. [applause] >> and i'm going to cap it up and i totally agree with that and one of the resources i want you to point is out is the family institute on line and platform for good a couple days ago. anne was there for the launch in dc and the goal of this whole thing is connect parents, educators and teens together to talk about both the eat your peas and how you stay a digital citizen and do the
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whole thing and i encourage everybody to check that out and i think that's the type of resource that will get us to where we need to go. it's called a "platform for good .org" and part of the family institute. >> yay. i think that's the way to cap it off really. let's lose the fear. let's bring -- it's safety, risk prevention, online risk prevention, whatever you want to call is is not the goal. it's important but not the goal. it's the mean to the end and the end is full safe effective successful engagement in participatory media and culture and society. this is a participatory medium that we're talking about in a network world. we're are in this environment and network
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participatory environment and our students need the tools. they need social emotional learning is a key tool and technical and literacy and media is behavioral so this has just been a fantastic day. thanks to all for coming and thank you everybody. i just want to share one piece of data which i don't understand completely. maybe our friend from facebook can explain, his twitter colleagues what they do. a hash tag was created and "stop bullying sf barb and hash tag and generated 3 million personal impressions and 1.3 million followers within the last 24 hours.
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[applause] isn't that incredible? we talked about some of the dangers in social media today and i guess that's part of the beauty of social media and the video is part of that as well, so on behalf of all the childrens and families and parents and communities in the district i want to thank everybody for coming for all the work that you do. i feel optimistic in all of work that you do. thank you and go forth and do great work.
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>> hi. i am cory with san francisco and we're doing stay safe and we're going to talk about what shelter in place or safe enough to stay in your home means. we're here at the urban center on mission street in san francisco and joined by carla, the deputy director of spur and one of the persons who pushed this shelter in place and safe
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enough to stay concept and we want to talk about what it means and why it's important to san francisco. >> as you know the bay area as 63% chance of having a major earthquake and it's serious and going to impact a lot of people and particularly people in san francisco because we live on a major fault so what does this mean for us? part of what it means is that potentially 25% of san francisco's building stock will be uninhibit tabl and people can't stay in their homes after an earthquake. they may have to go to shelters or leave entirely and we don't want that to happen. >> we want a building stock to encourage them to stay in the homes and encourage them to stay and not relocate to other
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locations and shelters. >> that's right so that means the housing needs to be safe enough to stay and we have been focused in trying to define what that means and you as a former building official knows better than anybody the code says if an earthquake happens it won't kill you but doesn't necessarily say that can you stay in your home and we set out to define what that might mean and you know because you built this house we're in now and this shows what it's like to be in a place safe enough to stay. it's not going to be perfect. there maybe cracks in the walls and not have gas or electricity within a while but can you essentially camp out within your unit. what's it going to take to get the housing stock up to this standard? we spent time
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talking about this and one of the building types we talk about was soft story buildings and the ground floor is vulnerable because there are openings for garages or windows and during the earthquake we saw in the marina they went right over and those are -- >> very vulnerable buildings. >> very and there are a lot of apartment buildings in san that that are like that. >> and time to. >> >> retrofit the buildings so people can stay in them after the earthquake. >> what do they need? do they need information? do they need incentives? mandates? >> that's a good question. i think it starts with information. people think that new buildings are earthquake
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proof and don't understand the performance the building will have so we want a transparent of letting people know is my building going to be safe in it after an earthquake? is my building so dangers i should be afraid of being injured? so developing a ranking system for buildings would be very important and i think for some of the larger apartment buildings that are soft story we need a mandatory program to fix the buildings, not over night and not without financial help or incentive, but a phased program over time that is reasonable so we can fix those buildings, and for the smaller soft story buildings and especially in san francisco and the houses over garages we need information and incentives and coaxing the people along and each of the owners want their
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house to be safe enough. >> we want the system and not just mandate everybody. >> that's right. >> i hear about people talking about this concept of resiliency. as you're fixing your knowledge you're adding to the city wide resiliency. >> >> what does that mean? >> that's a great question. what spur has done is look at that in terms of recovery and in new orleans with katrina and lost many of the people, hasn't recovered the building stock. it's not a good situation. i think we can agree and in san we want to rebuild well and quickly after a major disaster so we have defined what that means for our life lines. how do we need the gasolines to perform and water perform after an
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earthquake and the building stock as well, so we have the goal of 95% of our homes to be ready for shelter in place after a major earthquake, and that way people can stay within the city. we don't lose our work force. we don't lose the people that make san francisco so special. we keep everybody here and that allow us to recover our economy, and everything because it's so interdependent. >> so that is a difficult goal but i think we can achieve it over the long time so thank you very much for hosting us and hosting this great exhibit, and thank you very much for joining >> what's up san franciscans? we are very much in the the giving of the year. perfect time to learn something new and have a little fun. here are some events
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that can be shared to start the year right. on tuesday jerry 22 - an evening of live art making. come watch these talented folks draw and paint and maybe create art of around. maybe you are more of a scientist. cal academy's night light. tri hands-on activities real scientist, compare hearts and brains of animals against humans. tickets are 12 bucks. don't miss month-long event. at this saturday, join the american civil war association commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the
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civil war. colorful uniforms and soldiers. that's the week buzz. visit us at sftv.org >> hi, in san francisco we're doing a special series called stay safe, about staying in your home after an earthquake. and today we're going to be talking about the neighborhood support center to help people find new resources when they stay in their home. ♪ ♪ >> we're here at the urban center in san francisco with sarah karlewski, deputy director of spur. we're talking about the shelter, a safe place to stay, exhibition at their center.
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and part of being able to shelter in place in your home is to be able to find a place nearby where you can get the services that you might not have in your home. and that's what this little neighborhood support center is for. >> that's right. >> what are some of the services that might be provided in a neighborhood center like this? >> yeah. so, we think of the neighborhood support centers as really being homes away from home. so, after a major earthquake there is going to be a lot of confusion. people are going to need to try to meet up with other people. they're going to need a lot of information. so, a lot of what the neighborhood support center is going to provide is that information. basically we're going to be like a hub where people can come to get services, help, information, et cetera. what you see here on this table are a whole variety of did you ever rent things from tools, some walki-talkies.
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this helps people know what is going on in their neighborhood. over here you have a whole variety of water and canned goods. we're really hoping that people will stock up for themselves at least for the first 72 hours if not more. i know that i have a ton of canned food and other sorts of things such as water within my own home. and everybody should, but there's going to come a time where people are going to end up running out and needing more. so, that's what we've got right here. >> so, this neighborhood support center, this doesn't look to be a major city sponsored fully stocked space. it can be a small commercial space, even somebody's garage as long as they have the information, a guide of information, who to call for what, communications equipment, some power, have a generator. >> that's right. >> thinking of lights and charge your cell phones and so on. and probably be operated by volunteers.
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>> volunteers, maybe members of nert could help out, people who live in the neighborhood that have some building skill could be helpful. so, if there is a structural engineer living nearby or even an architect, they could really help people kind of understand what has happened to their homes and what sort of repairs might be needed. >> here we are with some of the things that you might find in a neighborhood support center. one thing we learned from hurricane katrina, people really rely on their portable electronics and their phone. we say here's a charging station tied up to the generation. the essential coffeepot. >> yes. >> maybe a computer, you can check your e-mail with. >> yes. we have our charging station here. and then over here you can see we've got a whole variety of things, including the all-important different tags. so, lawrence, do you want to talk a little about the tags? >> sure. people want to know what do these tags mean. is my building safe or unsafe.
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these are the city owe initial tags. staying in your home doesn't require that you get a tag. it just means that you use common sense and maybe get help from people who might be around who can help you evaluate whether it's a safe place to stay. >> you might want to know because regular city services are disrupted, you might want to know when trash pick up is, if you need to get clean water, et cetera. also in the neighborhood support center, that kind of information would be available and we've got a little of that up here. >> trash pick up resumes regular schedule on wednesday. >> that's right. >> please mark your human waste. >> that's right. >> so, this is kind of an information center, communication center, also a center that hopefully will show people how to relate to their neighboring communities, what else is happening city-wide. and, of course, this is sort of the ubiquitous form of communication. my cat is missing, call me. >> exactly, because a lot of times, even if you do have a
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cell phone, and people do if you're really trying to save some of your precious energy minutes, et cetera, or it's not working as well as it normally does, it is helpful to have a message board that you can get information to other people. and, so, that's what we're showing here. you can see people are going to be looking for their pets. they're going to be looking for rides. people are going to need to be sharing resources a much as they possibly can. another thing that you can see here is they're going to need to be fair tools and some of the things that people are going to need in order to be able to stay safer within their homes. so, we're just showing sort of a gesture to that with all these different tools here. but then also tarps, people are going to need to cover their windows if their windows are cracked, if their roofs are broken. so, ideally, the city would be able to know where all these neighborhood centers are and help deliver some of these supplies. >> they could come from a
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neighbor, maybe not. thank you so much for allowing us to come in and share this wonderful exhibit. and thank you for
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